Use this.

{
  /your/first/command
  /your/second/command
} &> /dev/null

Explanation

To eliminate output from commands, you have two options:

  • Close the output descriptor file, which keeps it from accepting any more input. That looks like this:

    your_command "Is anybody listening?" >&-

Usually, output goes either to file descriptor 1 (stdout) or 2 (stderr). If you close a file descriptor, you'll have to do so for every numbered descriptor, as &> (below) is a special BASH syntax incompatible with >&-:

/your/first/command >&- 2>&-

Be careful to note the order: >&- closes stdout, which is what you want to do; &>- redirects stdout and stderr to a file named - (hyphen), which is not what what you want to do. It'll look the same at first, but the latter creates a stray file in your working directory. It's easy to remember: >&2 redirects stdout to descriptor 2 (stderr), >&3 redirects stdout to descriptor 3, and >&- redirects stdout to a dead end (i.e. it closes stdout).

Also beware that some commands may not handle a closed file descriptor particularly well ("write error: Bad file descriptor"), which is why the better solution may be to...

  • Redirect output to/dev/null, which accepts all output and does nothing with it. It looks like this:

    your_command "Hello?" > /dev/null

For output redirection to a file, you can direct both stdout and stderr to the same place very concisely, but only in bash:

/your/first/command &> /dev/null

Finally, to do the same for a number of commands at once, surround the whole thing in curly braces. Bash treats this as a group of commands, aggregating the output file descriptors so you can redirect all at once. If you're familiar instead with subshells using ( command1; command2; ) syntax, you'll find the braces behave almost exactly the same way, except that unless you involve them in a pipe the braces will not create a subshell and thus will allow you to set variables inside.

{
  /your/first/command
  /your/second/command
} &> /dev/null

See the bash manual on redirections for more details, options, and syntax.