Standard Python dictionaries are unordered. Even if you sorted the (key,value) pairs, you wouldn't be able to store them in a dict in a way that would preserve the ordering.

The easiest way is to use OrderedDict, which remembers the order in which the elements have been inserted:

In [1]: import collections

In [2]: d = {2:3, 1:89, 4:5, 3:0}

In [3]: od = collections.OrderedDict(sorted(d.items()))

In [4]: od
Out[4]: OrderedDict([(1, 89), (2, 3), (3, 0), (4, 5)])

Never mind the way od is printed out; it'll work as expected:

In [11]: od[1]
Out[11]: 89

In [12]: od[3]
Out[12]: 0

In [13]: for k, v in od.iteritems(): print k, v
   ....: 
1 89
2 3
3 0
4 5

Python 3

For Python 3 users, one needs to use the .items() instead of .iteritems():

In [13]: for k, v in od.items(): print(k, v)
   ....: 
1 89
2 3
3 0
4 5