You can use the for-in loop as shown by others. However, you also have to make sure that the key you get is an actual property of an object, and doesn't come from the prototype.

Here is the snippet:

var p = {
    "p1": "value1",
    "p2": "value2",
    "p3": "value3"
};

for (var key in p) {
    if (p.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
        console.log(key + " -> " + p[key]);
    }
}

For-of with Object.keys() alternative:

var p = {
    0: "value1",
    "b": "value2",
    key: "value3"
};

for (var key of Object.keys(p)) {
    console.log(key + " -> " + p[key])
}

Notice the use of for-of instead of for-in, if not used it will return undefined on named properties, and Object.keys() ensures the use of only the object's own properties without the whole prototype-chain properties

Using the newObject.entries() method:

Note: This method is not supported natively by Internet Explorer. You may consider using a Polyfill for older browsers.

const p = {
    "p1": "value1",
    "p2": "value2",
    "p3": "value3"
};

for (let [key, value] of Object.entries(p)) {
  console.log(`${key}: ${value}`);
}